Tap Into Public’s Unhappiness for the Election Victory

I have always been a big fan of Vice President Joe Biden. He comes from a humble background and truly has his finger on the pulse of the country. Biden, in a recent interview, spoke about the public’s deep unhappiness with our elected officials and what was wrong with our political system. “The public just doesn’t relate to their government, because government doesn’t make them feel that it understands their needs and their pain,” he said.

That is the real challenge for. Bill Clinton has always been one of my heroes and I truly believed him when he said he “felt your pain.” Coming from a dysfunctional family, with an abusive father who had a serious alcohol problem, he spoke to the hearts and minds of many Americans.

When you think about the past four or five presidential elections, it is clear that many of the losing candidates were totally incapable of connecting with the voters. Something was missing and the majority of the electorate figured out who best represented their views. Senator Bob Dole was a career politician with a good record on the issues, but he didn’t spark any enthusiasm.

Senator John McCain was a war hero, despite what Donald Trump says, but somehow he didn’t stir mass loyalty. Poor Mitt Romney got quoted complaining about the “47 percent who rely on the government to take care of them.” Obviously, Romney failed to get those voters on his side and it cost him the election. President Barack Obama, as a candidate, hit a special chord with the voters and he won two terms in the White House.

So the real test for Clinton and Trump is which one can best tap into the public’s unhappiness and translate it into an election victory. Trump was able to win the Republican Party primary with his over-the-top rhetoric and his promises to make the country “great again.” Bernie Sanders won a massive number of supporters just by promising things that they wanted to hear, even if they were politically impossible to solve.

But now we are in an election campaign and the rules are different. Building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico will not create new businesses and more jobs. Beating up on immigrants will only carry you so far. The voters expect a lot more. This is the opening for Clinton to fill. She is smart on issues and talks about them. She is far more capable than Trump to sit in the White House.

In order to win this election she will have to convince the voters that she understands their grievances and “feels their pain.” Trump is incapable of arousing anything more than hate. So November presents her with the opportunity to win the election on the merits.

 

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Trump and Clinton Prepare to Face Off at Hofstra

Trump and Clinton Prepare to Face Off at Hofstra

The political world will soon focus all of its attention on the first presidential debate, which takes place on Sept. 26 at Hofstra University. The political talking heads are speculating on debate prep and the strategies of the candidates. But the real question is whether this debate will matter to the vast majority of voters, who have already decided who they dislike the least.

The current polls show Hillary Clinton with a lead of anywhere from two to 10 points over Donald Trump. Using my own unsophisticated polling, I haven’t met one person who has told me he or she is undecided. So how is the first debate going to make a major impact on this contest?

Trump has told the whole world what his positions are on immigration and trade deals. He has insulted every group — and important person — I can think of, starting with Pope Francis, the Gold Star Khan family, Hispanics, blacks, Mormons and most other ethnic voters. He has cast a dark cloud over America’s standing in the world, alarming our allies and making our enemies happy at the prospect of his winning this election.

Is he on the verge of changing his positions on any of those subjects? Is he going to apologize to the Khan family? Is he going to tell Sen. John McCain that, yes, he is a war hero? He still favors deporting 11 million undocumented residents, although he’s willing to start with criminals. Is he going to tell Sen. Ted Cruz that he was mistaken about the bizarre allegation that Cruz’s father was somehow involved in the assassination of John F. Kennedy?

There is no doubt that candidate Trump, on the advice of his new campaign team, will claim that “in the heat of the primaries, I may have insulted some people, and I regret doing that.” I know a non-apology when I hear one, and that type of talk won’t swing any votes. Is it possible for any candidate to redo all of his or her mistakes in one night? No.

The commentators on debate night will be looking to see if there’s a new Trump, but that’s doubtful. If he’s polite to Clinton, he’ll be praised for his performance, but that’s as likely as my winning the lottery. Will he call her “Crooked Hillary” at least once? You can bet the ranch on that one. Will he wow the audience with his vast knowledge of foreign affairs? Don’t count on it. Donald Trump is the Don Rickles of politics, and nothing can change that.

Clinton comes into this debate with a slight chance to sway some voters for a variety of reasons. Many people consider her insincere, so she’ll have a chance to polish her image. I know from personal experience that the in-person Hillary is a lot nicer than the in-person Donald. There’s no doubt that her mastery of facts will help persuade voters that she can do the job of being president. But her real challenge is persuading the public that all those email stories and other mistakes don’t disqualify her as a candidate.

Many past debates have produced memorable moments. Then Vice President Richard Nixon sweating under the bright television lights. George H.W. Bush looking at his watch to see when the clock would run out. Al Gore sighing with exasperation during his debate with George W. Bush. Lloyd Bentsen putting down opponent Dan Quayle by telling him, “I knew Jack Kennedy … senator, you’re no Jack Kennedy.”

One way or another, this debate will solidify the support that each of these candidates currently has. It may move a few moderate Republicans and single mothers in one direction or another. There are more undecided voters in the Trump camp than the Clinton camp, but that doesn’t say much. There may be a bump for Clinton or Trump, but it may be only a minor one.

My only hope is that the debate is civil and informative, and sends a message to our friends all over the world that the much-respected American political system is still alive and well. I don’t think that’s asking too much.

 

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A Never-Ending Presidential Race

A Never-Ending Presidential Race

Are we there yet?” 

Anyone who ever ridden in an automobile with a child, has heard that question repeatedly. 

Somehow, after following this year’s presidential election on a daily basis, I keep wanting to ask “Is it over yet? 

Regardless of whom you support, this has been one tough election for the voters.

Keep in mind that the race to the White House has been in the news for almost 18 months. 

We have been bombarded with cable news shows that feature every major and minor detail of the campaign. I am so tired of hearing “Breaking News” repeated 24 hours a day, especially when most of the news isn’t important and often is just plain silly. 

And those talking heads! 

Every channel assembles a panel of so-called experts who are there to support their candidate, along with one or two people who actually know what they are talking about. 

Some of the surrogates for the candidates must have been hired off the street, because they know nothing about politics, and have been given talking points.

Some of the better-known advocates open their mouths and spew crazy theories about either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. 

One of the latest is former Mayor Rudy Guliani who insisted that candidate Clinton is suffering from some ailment and “you can look it up on Google.” 

So, I went to Google and found ten items contradicting everything Guliani said. 

On the flip side of the coin, columnist after columnist has offered a theory that candidate Trump has some form of emotional condition that disqualifies him as a candidate. 

None of these columnists has any type of degree that makes them an expert.

I have my own thoughts about this election, having  won 13 contests of my own, to keep my seat in the state Assembly. 

Donald Trump may be the first major outsider to seek the White House in over 75 years, but he is also the worst candidate I have experienced in my long years of exposure to politics. 

Every day that Hillary Clinton makes a mistake, Donald Trump somehow finds a way to get into trouble and he becomes the headline. 

I have a hard time watching Trump speak to an all-white audience and make an appeal for the black or Hispanic vote. 

During the Republican debates, he managed to insult the Romney people (Mormons), the Bush people (old establishment Republicans) and Ted Cruz who had over 500 delegates pledged to him.  

Trump doesn’t seem to realize that once you insult every group or person on the planet, you can’t walk back your comments.  

I have heard every excuse for why Trump keeps changing his campaign team. 

His backers say it is because there is a new team for each stage of the election. No candidate for the White House has ever had a revolving team, with one group leaving and another group coming in.

The answer is simple. 

No one can work for Donald Trump because he doesn’t listen and thinks he is the last word on everything, such as “I know more about ISIS than the generals.”

While I am a supporter of Hillary Clinton, she makes me cringe on a daily basis on the email issue and the many ways she handles it. 

She never seems to have a consistent story about the emails and then wonders why some voters don’t trust her. 

She is, on her own, one of the more qualified people to ever run for the job, but she gets a big “F” for her failure to put controversial issues behind her.

I have not been to my doctor in a while but I guess there is no cure for election fatigue. 

There may be 80 or so days left until Election Day, but I keep asking myself “is it over yet?”

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Will I have to hold my nose when I cast my ballot?

I don’t know how many national elections you’ve experienced, but for me these happenings date back to Franklin D. Roosevelt. While I was only a child, I learned quickly that my parents, who survived the Great Depression, had a true passion for their president and voted as if it were a religious requirement.

I vividly recall the church bells ringing on an April afternoon in 1945 when the world learned that President Roosevelt had died at his retreat in Warm Springs, Ga. While I was not yet a student of politics, I came to understand how the right person at the right time commanded the loyalty of millions for all the right reasons.

Subsequent elections exposed voters to a variety of personalities, most of whom evoked some type of loyalty or devotion. Harry Truman was a simple Midwesterner who had the courage to order the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and thus end the war with Japan. While he wasn’t very charismatic, the voters recognized leadership and elected him. Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, a much-decorated warrior, appeared on the world stage at a time when the country wanted to be kept safe, and he had many devotees.

John F. Kennedy, young and charismatic, was embraced by young and old who believed that he would take America to a higher level. Richard Nixon may have won a few elections, but he didn’t stir the type of loyalty that his predecessors did. He was for some the only game in town.

Ronald Reagan came along at just the right time. America was disillusioned with President Carter and immersed in the Iran hostage crises. Reagan gave the country a feeling that we could truly be great again.

No one fainted with excitement when the two Bush presidents were elected, as they fit the role, but didn’t leave voters screaming for them to become emperors. Bill Clinton was another story. Despite all his weaknesses and scandals, he spoke to something in voters’ hearts, and people truly believed that he felt their pain.

The election of Barack Obama stood out because it was historic, and voters were attracted to the promise of a different type of presidency. Whether his tenure will be considered a success is up to the historians, who will make their pronouncement 10 or more years from now.

When I think about the 2016 election, I wonder whether I should take a shower before I vote or immediately after I leave the voting booth.

Never in my lifetime, or those of many who came before, have we experienced such an ugly and sick election cycle. Never before have American voters been asked to pick the lesser of two evils to be our commander in chief. The candidacy of Donald J. Trump is a warning for now and forever to avoid embracing TV or movie stars or sports icons. They may be slick and smooth in the media, but that isn’t the test of worldwide leadership.

When Trump announced his candidacy, a lot of us from both sides of the aisle thought it was just another commercial for the Trump brand. We started out thinking it was a joke, but it has escalated to an American tragedy. Is this country ready for an uninformed huckster who has insulted the vast majority of Americans and has cast a dark cloud over the most respected country in the world?

Are the majority of voters ready to make an empty suit the leader of the free world? I know that there’s a big swath of voters who are ready to do just that — some because they like Trump for all the wrong reasons, and others who want to kiss up to him for their own personal gain. Trump is incapable of making America great again, but is proving beyond any doubt that he is capable of making America hate again.

I wonder what the Trump kids, an accomplished group, are really thinking? If he were my father, I would be hiding in a closet at Trump Tower, totally embarrassed by his daily rants and his dark views. The last time a candidate with emotional issues was nominated for high office was when the Democrats picked Tom Eagleton to be their vice presidential nominee in 1972. He had the courage to bow out. You can look it up.

 

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Tap Into the Public’s Unhappiness for the Election Victory

Tap Into the Public’s Unhappiness for the Election Victory

I have always been a big fan of Vice President Joe Biden. He comes from a humble background and truly has his finger on the pulse of the country. Biden, in a recent interview, spoke about the public’s deep unhappiness with our elected officials and what was wrong with our political system. “The public just doesn’t relate to their government, because government doesn’t make them feel that it understands their needs and their pain,” he said.

That is the real challenge for. Bill Clinton has always been one of my heroes and I truly believed him when he said he “felt your pain.” Coming from a dysfunctional family, with an abusive father who had a serious alcohol problem, he spoke to the hearts and minds of many Americans.

When you think about the past four or five presidential elections, it is clear that many of the losing candidates were totally incapable of connecting with the voters. Something was missing and the majority of the electorate figured out who best represented their views. Senator Bob Dole was a career politician with a good record on the issues, but he didn’t spark any enthusiasm.

Senator John McCain was a war hero, despite what Donald Trump says, but somehow he didn’t stir mass loyalty. Poor Mitt Romney got quoted complaining about the “47 percent who rely on the government to take care of them.” Obviously, Romney failed to get those voters on his side and it cost him the election. President Barack Obama, as a candidate, hit a special chord with the voters and he won two terms in the White House.

So the real test for Clinton and Trump is which one can best tap into the public’s unhappiness and translate it into an election victory. Trump was able to win the Republican Party primary with his over-the-top rhetoric and his promises to make the country “great again.” Bernie Sanders won a massive number of supporters just by promising things that they wanted to hear, even if they were politically impossible to solve.

But now we are in an election campaign and the rules are different. Building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico will not create new businesses and more jobs. Beating up on immigrants will only carry you so far. The voters expect a lot more. This is the opening for Clinton to fill. She is smart on issues and talks about them. She is far more capable than Trump to sit in the White House.

In order to win this election she will have to convince the voters that she understands their grievances and “feels their pain.” Trump is incapable of arousing anything more than hate. So November presents her with the opportunity to win the election on the merits.

 

READ THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE AT ANTON MEDIA GROUP